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Management

To illustrate several aspects that are relevant in the context of Management, various scenarios from practice have been selected. The following questions are designed to give an impression of whether the described scenario is relevant in your organisation.

Questions for your organisation:

  • Is the situation recognisable?
  • Is the situation realistic? (or realistic in another context?)
  • What are the vulnerabilities in this situation?
  • What are the possible consequences of this situation?
  • What control measures can be taken to prevent the scenario?
  1. 1

    After the incident

    Although the organisation has a biosecurity policy in place, this policy is not actively safeguarded by management and staff. Only in the aftermath of an incident does the importance of the implementation of and compliance with biosecurity control measures become clear. As a result, the incident led to reputation damage and major additional consequences.

    management_scenario_1_CMS

    After an incident, evaluation has shown that culpable errors were made, which resulted in severe damage to the reputation of the organisation.

    Other relevant biosecurity pillar of good practice: awareness

    • If biosecurity duties and responsibilities are not documented and assigned, noncompliance with biosecurity control measures becomes likely.
    • Incidents can result in (major) reputation damage.

    Is this scenario applicable to your organisation?

    Is this scenario applicable to your organisation?
  2. 2

    Mystery guest

    A ‘mystery guest’ evades access controls and is able to enter a laboratory where high-risk material is stored. The mystery guest makes photographs as evidence and sends them to management.

    management_scenario_2_CMS

    A ‘mystery guest’ is someone who tests security measures and whether they are being applied correctly. This could be a colleague or someone who is hired specifically for this task. The findings of the mystery guest can be used as input to improve the security awareness of staff and possibly to make improvements.

    Other relevant biosecurity pillar of good practice: awareness

    • If security measures are not observed, an unauthorised person could gain access to vital areas of the organisation.
    • If a 'mystery guest' is able to gain access to a laboratory, an unauthorized person can do this as well. Such an incident can have undesirable consequences, which can lead to reputation damage.

    Is this scenario applicable to your organisation?

    Is this scenario applicable to your organisation?
  3. 3

    Fragmented documentation of duties and responsibilities

    A card reader has malfunctioned, resulting in uncontrolled access to a high-risk area. It is initially unclear whether this malfunction should be reported to the security service or the technical service. Due to poorly documented duties and responsibilities, the high-risk area remains accessible to non-authorised persons for too long.

    management_scenario_3_CMS

    Within an organisation, duties and responsibilities are assigned to various individuals. Due to a lack of oversight and consultation, gaps appear in the system and it becomes unclear for colleagues how the duties and responsibilities are organised.

    Other relevant biosecurity pillar of good practice: awareness

    • If it is unclear who is responsible for which security duties, undesirable situations can occur from a security perspective.
    • Weakened attention for biosafety and biosecurity can also spill over into other duties and responsibilities.

    Is this scenario applicable to your organisation?

    Is this scenario applicable to your organisation?